Forgiveness

Forgiveness - Ephesians 4:32Have lies been told about you?  Have you been rejected? Were you abandoned? Have you been a victim of abuse?  Were you falsely accused?  Maybe someone betrayed a confidence?

Healing can be found only in Jesus Christ whose blood offers forgiveness.

The greatest miracle God ever performs is through the Redemption. The concept of redemption means, “to purchase out of.”  Redemption means that the redeemed person is purchased by the payment of a price.   The price is the blood of Jesus.  What Jesus did on the Cross is the basis for our forgiveness and freedom from the bondage of bitterness, anger, grief, sadness, depression and etc.

Ephesians 4:31-32 says, “Let all bitterness, wrath, anger, clamor, and evil speaking be put away from you, with all malice. 32 And be kind to one another, tenderhearted, forgiving one another, even as God in Christ forgave you.”

In this verse, Paul emphasizes the position of forgiveness: even as God in Christ forgave you. The application is that since the believer has been forgiven, he should forgive fellow believers who have wronged him.

But first, we must be willing to face, be honest and take ownership of our own sins because if we don’t, we will always distort and overreact to the sins of others.

In Greek, “forgiveness” is aphiemi. In the New Testament, the concept of the unmerited “forgiveness” of God is stressed by the fact that God forgave our sins when His Son died for us. Each person is a debtor (Matt. 18:23–35) who has no hope of repaying God. Continue Reading

Consequences of Complacency

Isaiah 32:9-11, “Rise up, you women who are at ease, hear my voice; you complacent daughters, give ear to my speech. 10 In a year and some days you will be troubled, you complacent women; for the vintage will fail, the gathering will not come. 11 Tremble, you women who are at ease; be troubled, you complacent ones; strip yourselves, make yourselves bare, and gird sackcloth on your waists.” NKJV

The word complacent is used three times in verses 9, 10 and 11.  It means, self-satisfied and unconcerned, a sense of having arrived of not needing much else.

קֹמְנָה

qō me nā(h);  to raise up, to arise

Isaiah 32:9, “Rise up, you women who are at ease; hear my voice, you complacent daughters; give ear to my speech.”

Why does Isaiah say this? Isaiah ministered in a day when his people needed the courage of hope, just as we do today.  Isaiah addressed a group of women in Jerusalem who cared little about the political signs of the times, which was the threat of Assyrian invasion.  They weren’t worried about anything. They represent the kind of happiness that will kill us—earthly contentment, with no longings for God. They lived their lives of unrestrained gratification and perceived peace when God’s Spirit had identified turmoil. Continue Reading